The £ 1.4million country farmhouse for sale in Lancashire with its own swimming pool, sauna and jacuzzi

A rural family home on a farm has been put on the Lancashire property market for £ 1.4million.

The characteristic five-bedroom home on Old Crook Carr Farm combines rustic and modern living in a beautifully presented property.

Situated in the picturesque countryside of Barnoldswick, the family home offers luxurious and spacious living with the amenities of its own swimming pool, sauna, jacuzzi and movie theater.

Finished to a high standard and landscaped over 5,600 square feet, the property offers plenty of space both indoors and outdoors on the surrounding land, with terraces for you to step out directly to enjoy. ‘a clear view of the hills.

The land also includes a stable, a household and an enclosure for those with equestrian interests.



The swimming pool and the jacuzzi

From the outside the property looks like a real farmhouse, but inside the interior transforms it into a contemporary and well-designed space.

On the ground floor, the house consists of an elegant entrance hall, a family and formal living room, a beautifully appointed kitchen-dining area and a cinema room with sufficient space for several guests.

The house also has a superb indoor swimming pool with plenty of space to relax.

There is also a newly fitted sauna, shower room and Jacuzzi with folding doors offering stunning countryside views.



The great corridor

Upstairs, on the first floor, there are five bedrooms, all of superb dimensions, with four of the bedrooms fitted with their own luxurious suites.

Externally the property is accessed via a private gated driveway which leads to the house and its surrounding grounds.

There are plenty of parking spaces for several vehicles as well as garages and a stone kennel ideal for dogs.

Barnoldswick is a popular West Craven location with a range of high quality schools, shops and recreational facilities. The agglomerations of both.

Lancashire and Yorkshire are eminently accessible, as is the national motorway network near Colne.

You can see more of the property here.


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Armed gang tries to rob a farm on East Coast Road

Mamallapuram police arrested three youths who attempted to rob a farm house on the ECR after brutally attacking the guard with a modified Taser gun and knife.

Police said the defendants were identified as Dinesh, 25, from Red Hills, Karthikeyan, 20, and Mithun, 19, from Perambur.

On Thursday evening, the youths scaled the walls of Therkupattu’s farm on the East Coast Road within the confines of the Mamallapuram Police Station. The house belongs to a Vyjantimala, a businesswoman.

Taser modified

“Seeing Guardian Rajendran, they attacked him with a modified Taser gun and a butcher’s knife. They also tied up her 5 and 8 year old sons, ”said a police officer.

The three men then took the caretaker’s wife into the house in an attempt to open the doors and identify the room in which the valuables were kept.

“However, at that point, the milkman entered the house and the three fled the house with a woman’s cell phone and a ringtone,” the policeman added.

Police were notified of the incident and the guard was rushed to hospital.

A special team was formed by E. Sundaravathanan (ASP, Mamallapuram) comprising Inspector of Mamallapuram Vadivel Murugan, Deputy Inspector of Sadras Thirunavukkarasu, and Deputy Inspector of Koovathur and three police officers.

“The sniffer dog helped us by identifying the direction in which the trio went. We followed the CCTV footage and caught one suspect and based on the information provided by him, we caught the other two, ”Suntharavathanan explained.

Police discovered that Dinesh, who knows about electrical work, had turned a flashlight into a taser. “It wasn’t very effective though,” the ASP added. Further investigation is underway.

The police, with the help of experts, provide advice to the guardian’s children who saw their father being attacked with a sharp weapon.


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Tough times for fruit trees as some BC agricultural commodities soar – Kelowna Capital News

The B.C. government reports that farm product revenues hit a record high in 2019, reaching $ 3.9 billion, with increases in dairy, beef, eggs, chicken, blueberries, grapes and nursery plants.

Agriculture Minister Lana Popham attributes improved incomes to the province’s labor aimed at “helping farmers grow crops and enhancing food security,” as well as promotion through the Buy BC program in shops. But two-thirds of the increase in revenue from 2018 comes from cannabis sales, which increased by $ 300 million with the expansion of legal retail.

Sales of dairy products increased by $ 47 million, beef sales by $ 25 million and field vegetables by $ 17.5 million, with egg and nursery sales both increasing by 14 millions of dollars. But farmers note that this is gross sales, not net income. And a chronic labor shortage has been sharply accentuated by the COVID-19 pandemic, which followed a 28% increase in the minimum wage rate since 2017.

Like berry and vegetable growers on Vancouver Island and the Fraser Valley, tree fruit growers struggle to find enough workers for labor-intensive picking cherries and apples, the staple crops of the Okanagan and other fruit regions. Despite the British Columbia government’s leading efforts to support agriculture by quarantining foreign workers coming from Mexico. A recent survey by the BC Fruit Growers Association found that over 80% of growers expect to cut production this year due to COVID-19, labor market conditions and falling apple prices, by far the biggest crop in British Columbia.

Apple prices in British Columbia have been below cost of production for the past three years, after rebounding with the popularity of new varieties made in British Columbia such as Gala and Ambrosia, said Glen Lucas, manager. General of the BCFGA. Washington state apple production has grown rapidly to 50 times that of British Columbia, and harvest costs are rising.

“In the very short term, and the investigation was into this year, it just means getting away from the blocks, leaving the apples and cherries hanging,” Lucas said in an interview. “And that will most likely happen with some of the apple varieties that have been hit the hardest by the low prices.”

Longer term, the BC industry has expected a continued reduction in apple acreage for over 50 years as vineyards and other crops take their place.

“With this three-year price drop and rising costs, many regulatory costs, many real cash costs rising, we’ll start to see acres of apple trees retreat,” Lucas said. “We’re concerned about food security and what that means, and I guess it comes down to the production of cannabis and wine grapes.”

The BC cherry crop is a smaller but profitable segment, which struggled for the second year in a row with frequent rains and frost this year. Wet conditions mean the use of helicopters and large mobile fans to dry the cherry trees and reduced yield.

“There are fewer cherries, but what I saw was phenomenal,” Lucas said. “And I heard that the apple harvest is looking good. We expect good quality.

The province’s quarantine facility in Vancouver for foreign farm workers has prevented the type of virus outbreaks seen in Ontario, where a 14-day isolation is taking place on farms. But even with that, the association expects to go through 2020 with just 60 to 70 percent of the usual, predominantly Mexican workforce.

Mexico has its own struggle with COVID-19, where widespread outbreaks have shut down the government’s visa application center and the Department of Labor’s recruiting office.

“Buses will not run due to restrictions, or the inter-state borders of Mexico will be closed and people will not be able to cross them,” Lucas said. “It’s just one thing after another.”


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Tough times for fruit trees as some BC agricultural products soar – Terrace Standard

The B.C. government reports that farm product revenues hit a record high in 2019, reaching $ 3.9 billion, with increases in dairy, beef, eggs, chicken, blueberries, grapes and nursery plants.

Agriculture Minister Lana Popham attributes improved incomes to the province’s labor aimed at “helping farmers grow crops and enhancing food security,” as well as promotion through the Buy BC program in shops. But two-thirds of the increase in revenue from 2018 comes from cannabis sales, which increased by $ 300 million with the expansion of legal retail.

Sales of dairy products increased by $ 47 million, beef sales by $ 25 million and field vegetables by $ 17.5 million, with egg and nursery sales both increasing by 14 millions of dollars. But farmers note that this is gross sales, not net income. And a chronic labor shortage has been sharply accentuated by the COVID-19 pandemic, which followed a 28% increase in the minimum wage rate since 2017.

Like berry and vegetable growers on Vancouver Island and the Fraser Valley, tree fruit growers struggle to find enough workers for labor-intensive picking cherries and apples, the staple crops of the Okanagan and other fruit regions. Despite the British Columbia government’s leading efforts to support agriculture by quarantining foreign workers coming from Mexico. A recent survey by the BC Fruit Growers Association found that over 80% of growers expect to cut production this year due to COVID-19, labor market conditions and falling apple prices, by far the biggest crop in British Columbia.

Apple prices in British Columbia have been below cost of production for the past three years, after rebounding with the popularity of new varieties made in British Columbia such as Gala and Ambrosia, said Glen Lucas, manager. General of the BCFGA. Washington state apple production has grown rapidly to 50 times that of British Columbia, and harvest costs are rising.

“In the very short term, and the investigation was into this year, it just means getting away from the blocks, leaving the apples and cherries hanging,” Lucas said in an interview. “And that will most likely happen with some of the apple varieties that have been hit the hardest by the low prices.”

Longer term, the BC industry has expected a continued reduction in apple acreage for over 50 years as vineyards and other crops take their place.

“With this three-year price drop and rising costs, many regulatory costs, many real cash costs rising, we’ll start to see acres of apple trees retreat,” Lucas said. “We’re concerned about food security and what that means, and I guess it comes down to the production of cannabis and wine grapes.”

The BC cherry crop is a smaller but profitable segment, which struggled for the second year in a row with frequent rains and frost this year. Wet conditions mean the use of helicopters and large mobile fans to dry the cherry trees and reduced yield.

“There are fewer cherries, but what I saw was phenomenal,” Lucas said. “And I heard that the apple harvest is looking good. We expect good quality.

The province’s quarantine facility in Vancouver for foreign farm workers has prevented the type of virus outbreaks seen in Ontario, where a 14-day isolation is taking place on farms. But even with that, the association expects to go through 2020 with just 60 to 70 percent of the usual, mostly Mexican, workforce.

Mexico has its own struggle with COVID-19, where widespread outbreaks have shut down the government’s visa application center and the Department of Labor’s recruiting office.

“Buses will not run due to restrictions, or the inter-state borders of Mexico will be closed and people will not be able to cross them,” Lucas said. “It’s just one thing after another.”


@tomfletcherbc
[email protected]
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Legislative Assembly of British Columbia Coronavirus



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Tough times for fruit trees as some BC agricultural commodities soar – Coast Mountain News

The B.C. government reports that farm product revenues hit a record high in 2019, reaching $ 3.9 billion, with increases in dairy, beef, eggs, chicken, blueberries, grapes and nursery plants.

Agriculture Minister Lana Popham attributes improved incomes to the province’s labor aimed at “helping farmers grow crops and enhancing food security,” as well as promotion through the Buy BC program in shops. But two-thirds of the increase in revenue from 2018 comes from cannabis sales, which increased by $ 300 million with the expansion of legal retail.

Sales of dairy products increased by $ 47 million, beef sales by $ 25 million and field vegetables by $ 17.5 million, with egg and nursery sales both increasing by 14 millions of dollars. But farmers note that this is gross sales, not net income. And a chronic labor shortage has been sharply accentuated by the COVID-19 pandemic, which followed a 28% increase in the minimum wage rate since 2017.

Like berry and vegetable growers on Vancouver Island and the Fraser Valley, tree fruit growers struggle to find enough workers for labor-intensive picking cherries and apples, the staple crops of the Okanagan and other fruit regions. Despite the British Columbia government’s leading efforts to support agriculture by quarantining foreign workers coming from Mexico. A recent survey by the BC Fruit Growers Association found that over 80% of growers expect to cut production this year due to COVID-19, labor market conditions and falling apple prices, by far the biggest crop in British Columbia.

Apple prices in British Columbia have been below cost of production for the past three years, after rebounding with the popularity of new varieties made in British Columbia such as Gala and Ambrosia, said Glen Lucas, manager. General of the BCFGA. Washington state apple production has grown rapidly to 50 times that of British Columbia, and harvest costs are rising.

“In the very short term, and the investigation was into this year, that just means getting away from the blocks, leaving the apples and cherries hanging,” Lucas said in an interview. “And that will most likely happen with some of the apple varieties that have been hit the hardest by the low prices.”

Longer term, the BC industry has expected a continued reduction in apple acreage for over 50 years as vineyards and other crops take their place.

“With this three-year price drop and rising costs, many regulatory costs, many real cash costs rising, we’ll start to see acres of apple trees retreat,” Lucas said. “We’re concerned about food security and what that means, and I guess it comes down to the production of cannabis and wine grapes.”

The BC cherry crop is a smaller but profitable segment, which struggled for the second year in a row with frequent rains and frost this year. Wet conditions mean the use of helicopters and large mobile fans to dry the cherry trees and reduced yield.

“There are fewer cherries, but what I saw was phenomenal,” Lucas said. “And I heard that the apple harvest is looking good. We expect good quality.

The province’s quarantine facility in Vancouver for foreign farm workers has prevented the type of virus outbreaks seen in Ontario, where a 14-day isolation is taking place on farms. But even with that, the association expects to go through 2020 with just 60 to 70 percent of the usual, mostly Mexican, workforce.

Mexico has its own struggle with COVID-19, where widespread epidemics have shut down the government’s visa application center and the Department of Labor’s recruiting office.

“Buses will not run due to restrictions, or the inter-state borders of Mexico will be closed and people will not be able to cross them,” Lucas said. “It’s just one thing after another.”


@tomfletcherbc
[email protected]
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Legislative Assembly of British Columbia Coronavirus



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Tough times for fruit trees as some BC farm products soar – 100 Mile House Free Press

The B.C. government reports that farm product revenues hit a record high in 2019, reaching $ 3.9 billion, with increases in dairy, beef, eggs, chicken, blueberries, grapes and nursery plants.

Agriculture Minister Lana Popham attributes improved incomes to the province’s labor aimed at “helping farmers grow crops and enhancing food security,” as well as promotion through the Buy BC program in shops. But two-thirds of the increase in revenue from 2018 comes from cannabis sales, which increased by $ 300 million with the expansion of legal retail.

Sales of dairy products increased by $ 47 million, beef sales by $ 25 million and field vegetables by $ 17.5 million, with egg and nursery sales both increasing by 14 millions of dollars. But farmers note that this is gross sales, not net income. And a chronic labor shortage has been sharply accentuated by the COVID-19 pandemic, which followed a 28% increase in the minimum wage rate since 2017.

Like berry and vegetable growers on Vancouver Island and the Fraser Valley, tree fruit growers struggle to find enough workers for labor-intensive picking cherries and apples, the staple crops of the Okanagan and other fruit regions. Despite the British Columbia government’s leading efforts to support agriculture by quarantining foreign workers coming from Mexico. A recent survey by the BC Fruit Growers Association found that over 80% of growers expect to cut production this year due to COVID-19, labor market conditions and falling apple prices, by far the biggest crop in British Columbia.

Apple prices in British Columbia have been below cost of production for the past three years, after rebounding with the popularity of new varieties made in British Columbia such as Gala and Ambrosia, said Glen Lucas, manager. General of the BCFGA. Washington state apple production has grown rapidly to 50 times that of British Columbia, and harvest costs are rising.

“In the very short term, and the investigation was into this year, that just means getting away from the blocks, leaving the apples and cherries hanging,” Lucas said in an interview. “And that will most likely happen with some of the apple varieties that have been hit the hardest by the low prices.”

Longer term, the BC industry has expected a continued reduction in apple acreage for over 50 years as vineyards and other crops take their place.

“With this three-year price drop and rising costs, many regulatory costs, many real cash costs rising, we’ll start to see acres of apples retreat,” Lucas said. “We’re concerned about food security and what that means, and I guess it comes down to the production of cannabis and wine grapes.”

The BC cherry crop is a smaller but profitable segment, which struggled for the second year in a row with frequent rains and frost this year. Wet conditions mean the use of helicopters and large mobile fans to dry the cherry trees and reduced yield.

“There are fewer cherries, but what I saw was phenomenal,” Lucas said. “And I heard that the apple harvest is looking good. We expect good quality.

The province’s quarantine facility in Vancouver for foreign farm workers has prevented the type of virus outbreaks seen in Ontario, where a 14-day isolation is taking place on farms. But even with that, the association expects to go through 2020 with just 60 to 70 percent of the usual, predominantly Mexican workforce.

Mexico has its own struggle with COVID-19, where widespread epidemics have shut down the government’s visa application center and the Department of Labor’s recruiting office.

“Buses will not run due to restrictions, or the inter-state borders of Mexico will be closed and people will not be able to cross them,” Lucas said. “It’s just one thing after another.”


@tomfletcherbc
[email protected]
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Legislative Assembly of British Columbia Coronavirus



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