Attleboro Willow Tree Poultry Farm Products Recalled | Local News

ATTLEBORO – Willow Tree Poultry Farm, the town’s well-known company, is recalling about 52,000 pounds of chicken salad and dipping products that could be contaminated with plastic, the Food Safety and Inspection Department said Tuesday. foods from the United States Department of Agriculture.

The items were produced Aug. 10-13 and may contain hard, white plastic, FSIS said.

The following products are subject to a recall:

  • Five-pound container of Willow Tree Premium White Meat Chicken Caesar Dip with best before dates 3/9/2021 and 6/9/2021.
  • Five-pound, 12-ounce containers of Willow Tree Premium White Meat Buffalo Chicken Dip with sale dates before 3/9/2021 and 5/9/2021.
  • Five-pound container of Willow Tree Premium White Meat Buffalo Chicken Salad with a best before date of 7/9/2021.
  • 15 oz container of Willow Tree Premium White Meat Buffalo Chicken Salad with sale dates before 07/09/2021 and 09/09/2021.
  • 15 oz container of Willow Tree Premium Nut Cranberry Chicken Salad with a best before date of 08/09/2021.
  • 15 oz container of Willow Tree Premium White Meat Classic Chicken Salad with best before dates 07/09/2021, 08/09/2021, 09/09/2021 and 10/09/2021.
  • Seven and a half ounce container of Willow Tree Premium White Meat Classic Chicken Salad with sale dates before 07/09/2021 and 09/09/2021.
  • Ten-pound container of Willow Tree Premium White Meat Classic Chicken Salad with a best before date of 08/09/2021.

The recalled products bear the establishment number “EST. P-8827 “inside USDA inspection mark.

Items have been shipped to wholesale and retail locations in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania.

The problem was discovered after the company received a consumer complaint and notified FSIS.

“There have been no confirmed reports of adverse effects from the consumption of these products,” FSIS officials said. “Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a health care provider. “

FSIS is concerned that some products may be frozen and in consumer freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

They must be discarded or returned to the place of purchase, agency authorities said.

Last September, Willow Tree, as part of FSIS, recalled about 6,890 pounds of chicken salad due to poor branding and an undeclared allergen.

Willow Tree is one of the best-known businesses in the Attleboro area, and its South Main Street (Route 152) head office and store near Seekonk is a popular stop for area residents.

Consumers with questions about the latest recall can contact Alex Cekala, General Manager of Willow Tree Poultry Farm, at [email protected] or 508-951-8351.


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Terni Farm / Shreyas Patil Architects

Terni Farm / Shreyas Patil Architects

© Atik Bheda© Atik Bheda© Atik Bheda© Atik Bheda+ 36


  • Zoned Area of ​​this architectural project Zoned:
    3510 sq. Ft.

  • Year Year of completion of this architecture project

    Year:


    2020


  • Photographs Photographs: Atik Bheda

  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project

    Manufacturers: MyWindows


  • Principal architect:

    Shreyas Patil

© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda

Text description provided by the architects. A family of doctors wanted a weekend getaway to design on their ancestral farmland located in the village of Terni. The idea was to take advantage of outdoor spaces around a swimming pool nestled between sugar cane fields and mango orchards. The profile was to design a place that gives users the feeling of living between farmland, less with themselves and more with the flora and fauna of the site.

© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda

The road to the town’s farmland takes you through a series of villages in Karnataka and Maharashtra, casting impressions of the local villages which have a strong character of rural material palette and simplicity in architectural style bringing a feeling of rootedness and humility in the lifestyle, a contrast to urban life. Customers were eager to have a slice of this rustic palette for their weekend. And, as architects, we had our contemporary take on it.

© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda
Plan
Plan
© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda

Like all village houses in this region, this piece of built form is essentially divided into three main spaces. One, dedicated to daytime activities such as lounging, eating, cooking and having fun. A second space flanking the length of the pool and the deck houses the bath and the toilets. Finally, an elevated space is positioned just in front of these spaces for a good night’s sleep. Unlike a typical village house housed under a single gable roof, each of these spaces is sheltered by its own independent gable roof. Thus, the image obtained of the roof silhouette recalls that of neighboring villages.

© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda

These three units are spaced apart from each other so that the cantilever gables of each roof slope toward the buffer zones that form hardwood and hard courtyards. The baseboards and roofs of these three constructed spaces cascade down to the east, allowing all spaces to see and enjoy the pool, also adding benefits of blocking out glare from the south and west and the cross rains while directing users towards a softer light on the east and north.

© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda
Sections
Sections
© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda

The house disperses in a compound boundary right in the middle of the fields only to protect its users from unknown wildlife. As you approach from the east, a large lawn stretches around the pool. The swimming pool connects the house to the west end. One can walk barefoot to the house with the swimming pool on the stone terraces or walk along the terracotta jali walls on the landscape. The architectural spaces revolve around the central living pavilion. The main living pavilion serves as a terrace for the bedroom and the pool on either side, creating a variety of functional spaces.

© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda

The bedroom is independently placed on a higher plinth with aluminum sliding windows that open the bedroom to the landscape. A slender slit window is open to the west which frames the mountains in the distance across farmland also framing a spectacular view of the sunset. As one gets comfortable on the bed the only framed views are open to the sky gardens, the light is reflecting the pool and the sunlit clay tile roofs of the other two. volumes in lower tiers. This bedroom also dialogues with the living pavilion through a thick garden courtyard visually widening the volume.

© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda

The play of materials of this project establishes a balance between vernacular tones and contemporary hues bringing both warmth and elegance. The warmth of the earth’s browns and blacks is achieved by using clay tiles for the roof, wire-cut hollow mud bricks for the jali walls, and treated kadappa stone floors. The balance of modernity was marked by steel trusses, freestanding white walls and luxury ceramic pool tiles.

© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda
Elevations
Elevations
© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda

The impact of this location was to give the user a different rhythm, where they could soak up the calm and openness of farm life. The immediate farms of this farm change in character with the seasons, shifting from barren land ready to be plowed to tall sugar cane fully harvested, which adds to the change in the quality of the built form and image of the place.

© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda

A double swing hangs casually from one of the beams with the pool, leaving a swing above the waters, creating an unusual experience. Just across that corner, a breakfast table hangs from the roof truss, allowing it to float. The central pavilion houses the living room and dining room as a single space with openings on each wall that serves as a pantry at one end and a seating area at the other. The entire built form is organized as a system of interlocking pavilions, connected to each other by open corridors, independent walls and gardens. This project is choreographed to create open, fluid movement within the wall and floor elements beneath a series of hovering steel lattice gable roofs.

© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda
ISO burst
ISO burst
© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda

The open plan adds to the dynamic nature of the space allowing the place to be used according to season, weather and occasion. A minimum of teak carpentry units are sprinkled over the design just enough to store the essentials for a weekend stay. The play of shadow and light is bought by the positioning of independent walls and roofs that form the courtyards. As one walks through these spaces, the walls and openings are designed to create a juxtaposed view of the farmland with the architecture itself, reminiscent of the power of nature and architecture.

© Atik Bheda
© Atik Bheda



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Export clusters of agricultural products to be promoted in Karnataka

Union State Minister for Agriculture and Farmer Welfare Shobha Karandlaje said the Center will prioritize promoting agricultural export clusters in Karnataka.

Speaking to the media in Udupi, she said that at present, Karnataka has export hubs for coffee, pepper and pink onion. It is possible to create export clusters for turmeric, fruits, jaggery, millets and other agricultural products.

The minister said that the state can promote the cultivation of millet. At present, Uttarakhand is a leader in the export of millets to India. The climate of southern India is suitable for the cultivation of millet. The United Nations, at the request of India, declared 2023 the International Year of Millet.

Farm workers pound the ragi, or finger millet, on the outskirts of Bangalore.

Farm workers pound the ragi, or finger millet, on the outskirts of Bangalore. | Photo credit: K. MURALI KUMAR

Udupi-Chikkamagaluru Constituency MP Karandlaje said many states in the northeast have traditionally grown crops using organic methods. These crops and their by-products are in high demand by agricultural enterprises for the export market.

The minister said that the Union government, through the Agricultural Infrastructure Fund, insists on the creation of more agricultural producer organizations (OPAs), in particular by organizing small and medium farmers.

Oil seeds, cereals, legumes

Ms Karandlaje said the country has not yet become self-sufficient in the production of oilseeds, grains and pulses. About 70% of edible oil is imported. Therefore, the government has started providing free mini oilseed kits to farmers to encourage production. It is also investing in research and development to make oilseed cultivation profitable in the dryland belt and in the development of advanced processing technologies.

Coconut export

Ms Karandlaje said that the Union’s Cabinet recently decided to lift the ban on the export of coconut and its products. This will help many farmers, and coconut prices will stabilize after a year. The government has also decided to appoint a coconut farmer to chair the Coconut Development Board instead of appointing an IAS official to that post.

A vendor selling coconuts at Yelahanka in Bangalore.

A vendor selling coconuts at Yelahanka in Bangalore. | Photo credit: SUDHAKARA JAIN

The Union Minister said that after the COVID-19 pandemic, some young people are returning from cities to engage in agriculture, which appears to have contributed to the increase in production in the country.


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