Waiwhero / Tivez + Brown Farmhouse

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Waiwhero / Tivez + Brown Farmhouse

© Jason Frank Rothenberg© Jason Frank Rothenberg© Jason Frank Rothenberg© Jason Frank Rothenberg+ 9

© Jason Frank Rothenberg
© Jason Frank Rothenberg

Text description provided by the architects. The design evolved as two fan-shaped buildings and around two established kanuka trees, the idea deriving from the underlying geology of the fan formation of the Moutere Hills. The separate buildings reduce the clutter of the house and form a sheltered sunny courtyard to escape the strong breezes of northeast Tasman Bay. The eccentric angles of the house are meant to mirror the shapes of hop smokers found throughout the region. Western Red Cedar was chosen as the exterior wall covering for a natural gray and tone with the adjacent hills and kanuka trees in place. A material was also chosen to meet customers’ brief demands for a house suitable for a rural New Zealand landscape and to evoke an elegant farmhouse. Cedar was also used for the slatted screens that shade the rooms in the north and west sun and left in the elements. The main entrance door is solid cedar laminate with an inlaid pattern unique to this home.

© Jason Frank Rothenberg
© Jason Frank Rothenberg

The house sits on a narrow ridge and is inserted into the landscape in a series of long terraces developed with landscape architects Wraight + Associates to merge the house, its immediate terraces and gardens with the wider agricultural landscape. Glulam Lawson cypress columns and beams define the interior of the main living room, with pine plywood ceiling liner and selected Matai flooring to evoke a rural home interior.

© Jason Frank Rothenberg
© Jason Frank Rothenberg

The house is self-sufficient with the exception of electricity integrating a Biolytix sanitation system, solar water heater and collected rainwater.

Plan
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